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All are Welcome
 
Pastor: Fr. Gigi Philip
Administrative Assistant: Cynthia Livera

Sunday Masses
Saturday5:00 PMEnglish,
Singles for Christ Choir
Sunday9:00 AMItalian
Italian Choir
10:30 AMEnglish,
Children's Liturgy
Organist/Soloist
12:00 PMEnglish,
Couples for Christ Choir
Weekday Masses
Tuesday7:00 PMItalian,
Devotion to Padre Pio
Wednesday7:00 PMEnglish,
Devotion to Our Lady of
Perpetual Help
Thursday7:00 PMEnglish,
Devotion to St. Norbert
Adoration of the Blessed Sacrament till 8:00 PM
Friday8:35 AMItalian
Adoration of the Blessed Sacrament till 9:15 AM
Elementary Schools
St. Norbert - 60 Maniza Rd. 416-393-5309
St. Robert  - 70 Bainbridge Avenue 416-393-5297
Secondary Schools
Madonna   - 20 Dubray Avenue 416-393-5506

 
Wheel Chair Accessible

Office Hours
Monday - Friday    8:30 AM - 4:30 PM;
(Lunch break 12:00 PM to 1:00 PM)
Contact
100 Regent Road
North York, Ontario M3K 1H3
Phone: 416-636-0213
Fax: 416-636-9431
office@stnorbertschurch.org
www.stnorbertschurch.org
Confession
Saturdays 4:15 - 4:45 PM and upon request
Sacrament of Baptism
Please contact the office as soon as possible
Sacrament of Matrimony
Please contact the office way in advance
Rite of Christian Initiation of Adults (RCIA)
Please contact the office
Sacrament of the Sick
Please contact the office
Blessings (home, vehicle, workplace)
Please contact the office
Visiting the sick and elderly at home
Please contact the office

Thinking about the priesthood or religious life? Hearing Jesus' call "Come and follow me"? Not sure?

Visit Vocations Toronto at www.vocationstoronto.ca, a resourceful site in answering these questions.

Knights of Columbus
Meetings 3rd Thursday of the month
Please contact the office
St. Vincent de Paul Society
Please contact the office
Youth Group
Please contact the office
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Reflections
for Sunday, June 14, 2009

The inauguration of the Holy Eucharist is celebrated first and foremost on Maundy Thursday in its natural place the night before Jesus died on the Cross. But because that celebration takes place very much in the context of the sadness of the events of Christ's passion and death, the Church gives us this second feast in the course of the year to help us to get to explore more fully the Eucharist, the commemoration of the Last Supper.

Two Sundays ago we celebrated Pentecost and last Sunday we celebrated the feast of the Blessed Trinity and now we commemorate the Blessed Eucharist. There is a certain logic in this sequence of celebrations.

Pentecost is the Birthday of the Church and on the Feast of the Blessed Trinity we look at the very nature of God himself. Today in the Feast of Corpus Christi we examine how God continues to make himself present to his Church, how he sustains and nourishes us. And he achieves all this principally through the Sacrament of the Holy Eucharist.

On the night before he died Jesus gave his disciples a Last Supper. It was a meal with a difference. It was a meal during which, and through which, he showed them the very depths of his love.

He gave them special instructions both by word and example; the example being the washing of feet. And then, as we know, he took the bread, blessed and broke it and said: this is my body which is given up for you. Do this in memory of me. And then he did the same with the wine.

By these actions Jesus brought into focus, and in a mysterious way actually made present, the events which were to happen on the following three days.

And through our following out of Jesus' command, and doing this in memory of him, in an extraordinary way those same events are made present here on this altar, and in this Church and in our hearts.

The Last Supper wasn't an event that was sprung on the apostles out of the blue. And to prove this we only have to look at today's Gospel reading. Jesus takes the five loaves and the two fish and manages to feed five thousand people.

The incident was clearly meant to be a foreshadowing on the Last Supper since all the essential elements are present: He took the bread, said the blessing, broke the bread and gave it to the people. What could be more Eucharistic than that?

And all had their fill! Here in the celebration of the Eucharist—whether it be on a high day with hundreds of people, all the ceremony, altar servers, choirs, bells and smells or quietly and in a very subdued manner with just a few people on what you might call a ‘low day'—we encounter the Lord Most High and he gives us real nourishment for our souls. So much nourishment that it would take a lifetime to begin to appreciate.

 

"Jesus made the crowds welcome and talked to them about the Kingdom of God; and he cured those who were in need of healing."

You might think that this first verse of our text today is simply an introductory scene-setting phrase, but it too is loaded with meaning. Jesus was talking to the crowds about the Kingdom of God and curing those who needed healing.

Besides the actual Liturgy of the Eucharist we begin each mass with the equally important Liturgy of the Word in which, just as in that opening sentence, we are made welcome, we share the scriptures and we talk together about the Kingdom of God.

And then there is the aspect of healing; it is in the context of healing the sick that Jesus feeds the Five Thousand. He heals not only their bodies but also their souls.

The very word salvation means healing, but not at any superficial level for the healing that Jesus brings, the healing we find in the Eucharist, is actually a profound experience of salvation. It permeates every part of our being.

Yesterday we celebrated the First Communion of ten young children; they received Our Lord in the Blessed Sacrament for the very first time.

It was a great day for them and for their families and indeed for the whole parish. We take this opportunity to congratulate them and to assure them of our prayers for a full and faithful Christian life.

We have been speaking about what a profound mystery the mass is and we know that huge books have been written on the theology of the Eucharist, we are aware that there are theologians who have worked on the subject for whole careers and not yet exhausted its depths.

Yet the Church has determined that by the age of seven our young people have the capability to understand what it is that they are receiving.

This is because the basics are simple. Through the intercession of Christ the bread and wine are transformed into his body and blood. At the mass we are united with the Last Supper and here on this altar just as there in the Upper Room we receive the body and blood of Christ in the form of bread and wine.

You can go into the metaphysics of it if you like, but it is not necessary. The Lord who commanded the wind and the waves, who made water into wine, who by his word healed the paralytic, this same Lord offers us his body and blood under the form of these simple elements.

Let us praise and thank God for this great gift which enables us to be united with Christ's work of redemption in a real and most intimate way. And let us celebrate this Eucharist in his memory and come to communion with him as we share his Body and Blood.

 
Readings of the day:
First Reading:
Second Reading:
Gospel:

Homily from Father Alex McAllister SDS - RC Church of Christ the King

   

Reflections are available for the following Sundays:

2018
2017
2016
2015
2014
2013
2012
2011
2010
2009
2008
2007

St. Norbert's Church - Toronto