St. Norbert's Roman Catholic Church - Info Sheet Print Close

All are Welcome
 
Pastor: Fr. Gigi Philip
Administrative Assistant: Cynthia Livera

Sunday Masses
Saturday5:00 PMEnglish,
Singles for Christ Choir
Sunday9:00 AMItalian
Italian Choir
10:30 AMEnglish,
Children's Liturgy
Organist/Soloist
12:00 PMEnglish,
Couples for Christ Choir
Weekday Masses
Tuesday7:00 PMItalian,
Devotion to Padre Pio
Wednesday7:00 PMEnglish,
Devotion to Our Lady of
Perpetual Help
Thursday7:00 PMEnglish,
Devotion to St. Norbert
Adoration of the Blessed Sacrament till 8:00 PM
Friday8:35 AMItalian
Adoration of the Blessed Sacrament till 9:15 AM
Elementary Schools
St. Norbert - 60 Maniza Rd. 416-393-5309
St. Robert  - 70 Bainbridge Avenue 416-393-5297
Secondary Schools
Madonna   - 20 Dubray Avenue 416-393-5506

 
Wheel Chair Accessible

Office Hours
Monday - Friday    8:30 AM - 4:30 PM;
(Lunch break 12:00 PM to 1:00 PM)
Contact
100 Regent Road
North York, Ontario M3K 1H3
Phone: 416-636-0213
Fax: 416-636-9431
office@stnorbertschurch.org
www.stnorbertschurch.org
Confession
Saturdays 4:15 - 4:45 PM and upon request
Sacrament of Baptism
Please contact the office as soon as possible
Sacrament of Matrimony
Please contact the office way in advance
Rite of Christian Initiation of Adults (RCIA)
Please contact the office
Sacrament of the Sick
Please contact the office
Blessings (home, vehicle, workplace)
Please contact the office
Visiting the sick and elderly at home
Please contact the office

Thinking about the priesthood or religious life? Hearing Jesus' call "Come and follow me"? Not sure?

Visit Vocations Toronto at www.vocationstoronto.ca, a resourceful site in answering these questions.

Knights of Columbus
Meetings 3rd Thursday of the month
Please contact the office
St. Vincent de Paul Society
Please contact the office
Youth Group
Please contact the office
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Reflections
for Sunday, January 13, 2013

The people were filled with expectation! The whole of the Christmas season is filled with expectation when we review the readings and understand the mysteries. Are we filled with expectation? That is the challenge!

The Prophet Isaiah begins the readings today with this wonderful proclamation: Comfort my people! It is God who is speaking through the Prophet. How often our hearts cry out for comfort. When there is tragedy we cry out for comfort. When there is suffering we cry out for comfort. The people of the time of Isaiah were recognizing the results of their sins and could understand a bit the tragedy and suffering of sin - so they cry out for comfort.

We modern people are like our ancestors in that we rarely recognize the tragedy and suffering of sin and so we rarely reach out to the God who has promised us so much. More and more of us today no longer believe in a personal God or perhaps not even in any God at all. Even those of us who believe often live as if there is no God.

The Letter of Titus tells us that Jesus Christ gave himself for us to deliver us from all lawlessness and to cleanse for himself a people as his own, eager to do what is good. We want to believe that and yet our hearts cry out when we don't want to be cleansed or to do what is good. There is confusion among the people today as there was among the people in the time of our ancestors and in the time of Jesus. There are people who claim to speak for God but who clearly do not speak the same words that we find in the Scriptures. Today many Christians are so caught up in interpreting the Scriptures in a way that simply does not reflect what the Scriptures said, according to the understanding of tradition. People claim to have new insights and these new insights justify behaviors quite contrary to the traditional understanding of the Scripture.

Luke's Gospel today brings us to the scene of the baptism of Jesus. Jesus who is God is baptized like any other follower of Christ. Yet others recognized that something unusual happened at the baptism of Jesus and that there was some unusual but identifiable presence of the divine at the baptism. Like any manifestation of the divine, some were able to recognize it and others could not.

What we can hear today is that you and I receive our faith from others. We cannot make it up by ourselves. That is why it is important to stay within Scripture and Tradition in our understanding of Scripture says. When new traditions are introduced because of some modern understanding of Scripture, we must be very cautious. Even the early Church recognized that there are ways to understand the divine reality that are new and revolutionary. That is why we hear about a Council of the leaders in the Acts of the Apostles.

The Baptism of Jesus is telling us that what Jesus touches becomes holy by His touch. What Jesus proclaims is holy because Jesus is Lord. When changes are desired or seen as necessary, we can never proclaim them on our own. We can talk about them and even discuss them, but the authority to understand the Word of God and the tradition handed down to us is a gift to the Church as a whole and to the leaders within the Church.

Jesus' humanity is manifested at His Baptism. The divinity of Jesus shines through in His Baptism. In His Baptism, Jesus embraces the suffering of his humanity so that divinity can shine through. Today it is in the Church that we find the divinity of Jesus hidden in His humanity. We are tempted to run away from the humanity of Jesus.

As Jesus accepting completing the suffering of the human condition in His Baptism, so also must we today accept the suffering of His Church as we open our hearts to His divinity within the Church. Lord, help us see!

 
Readings of the day:
First Reading: Isaiah 42.1-4, 6-7
Second Reading: Acts 10.34-38
Gospel: Luke 3.15-16, 21-22

Homily from Abbot Philip, OSB, of the Benedictine Abbey of Christ in the Desert.

   

Reflections are available for the following Sundays:

2018
2017
2016
2015
2014
2013
2012
2011
2010
2009
2008
2007

St. Norbert's Church - Toronto