St. Norbert's Roman Catholic Church - Info Sheet Print Close

All are Welcome
 
Pastor: Fr. Gigi Philip
Administrative Assistant: Cynthia Livera

Sunday Masses
Saturday5:00 PMEnglish,
Singles for Christ Choir
Sunday9:00 AMItalian
Italian Choir
10:30 AMEnglish,
Children's Liturgy
Organist/Soloist
12:00 PMEnglish,
Couples for Christ Choir
Weekday Masses
Tuesday7:00 PMItalian,
Devotion to Padre Pio
Wednesday7:00 PMEnglish,
Devotion to Our Lady of
Perpetual Help
Thursday8:30 AMEnglish,
Devotion to St. Norbert
Friday8:30 AMItalian
Adoration of the Blessed Sacrament till 9:15 AM
Elementary Schools
St. Norbert - 60 Maniza Rd. 416-393-5309
St. Robert  - 70 Bainbridge Avenue 416-393-5297
Secondary Schools
Madonna   - 20 Dubray Avenue 416-393-5506

 
Wheel Chair Accessible

Office Hours
Monday - Friday    8:30 AM - 4:30 PM;
(Lunch break 12:00 PM to 1:00 PM)
Contact
100 Regent Road
North York, Ontario M3K 1H3
Phone: 416-636-0213
Fax: 416-636-9431
office@stnorbertschurch.org
www.stnorbertschurch.org
Confession
Saturdays 4:15 - 4:45 PM and upon request
Sacrament of Baptism
Please contact the office as soon as possible
Sacrament of Matrimony
Please contact the office way in advance
Rite of Christian Initiation of Adults (RCIA)
Please contact the office
Sacrament of the Sick
Please contact the office
Blessings (home, vehicle, workplace)
Please contact the office
Visiting the sick and elderly at home
Please contact the office

Thinking about the priesthood or religious life? Hearing Jesus' call "Come and follow me"? Not sure?

Visit Vocations Toronto at www.vocationstoronto.ca, a resourceful site in answering these questions.

Knights of Columbus
Meetings 3rd Thursday of the month
Please contact the office
St. Vincent de Paul Society
Please contact the office
Youth Group
Please contact the office
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Reflections
for Sunday, September 15, 2019

Today's readings present a shepherd rejoicing over finding a lost sheep, a housewife rejoicing over finding a lost coin, and a father rejoicing over the return of his lost son. The three parables are in answer to the Pharisees and Scribes complaints about Jesus, saying that he can't be the Messiah because he welcomes sinners and eats with them. Eating with someone, for the ancients and for us, is a way of expressing friendship and love. Jesus does not argue that he is eating with sinners, his argument is that he has called them to God and they have come. He is friends with them. He loves them. He is full of joy that they have come home to God.

Jesus is telling us that we should be happy that others have been forgiven. He is also telling us that we should join in the joy of the Lord because we have been forgiven.

First of all, unlike the Pharisees and scribes who saw themselves as holy and who considered everyday people as the hoard of sinners, the vast majority of us are well aware of our failures. Sometimes we think about something that we have done and feel devastated. These thoughts besiege us: How could God forgive me? Maybe I don't even belong here, with people whose commitment to the Lord has been far more solid than mine. Perhaps at times we have an experience of God's love in our lives and then suffer from our past even more. This is all really the normal reaction of our commitment to the Lord. The closer we come to Him, the more we are aware of the impact of the times that we did not choose Him. Maybe the problem is that we are focusing on ourselves rather than on God. According to the three parables, the Lord is delighted that we are once more in His Company. Like the Forgiving Father, His focus is not on the past. He doesn't carry a grudge. His focus is on our present and our presence with him. Our return to Him is a cause of his joy.

It takes a tremendous amount of humility to recognize that God has forgiven us. We are OK with Him. This is his doing. His Grace. We cannot cause God's grace to happen in our lives. We cannot cause God's forgiveness to take place. But it does happen. It does take place. God is bigger than us, infinitely bigger. God is greater than us, infinitely greater. So what is it that we have done that we think is so bad that God would not invite us to eat with Him? Can anything we have done be beyond God's compassion and mercy? There is nothing We cannot because there is nothing He does not forgive. His only reaction is pure joy. But if we stay mired in the past, we will have no present and no future. The Lord is calling us into our joy and calling us to move beyond whatever is holding us back. He forgives us. We need to forgive ourselves.

The Scribes and Pharisees did not seem at all pleased that Jesus had forgiven known sinners. We really have to be careful that we don't behave the same way. Perhaps we come to Mass at times and see someone that we know has done some really bad stuff. What is our reaction? According to the Gospel for today, our reaction should be: I am happy he or she is here, choosing Christ. Another's past is not my concern. I need to be happy for him or her. I am here to eat with him or her. I have had people say to me, "Father, that person you were joking with has really done some horrible things." Oh, so I should avoid him or her and only spend time with the very best of people? That does not sound like the instruction the Gospel for today is presenting. Maybe no one here would go to that extreme, but perhaps there are times that the thought comes flashing across our minds: "What is that lowlife doing here?" That is a terrible. That person is here for the same reasons that we are here: compassion, forgiveness, and love. The Lord feels bad for what we have done to ourselves. And He feels bad for what that person did to himself or herself. The Lord forgives us. The Lord forgives Him or her. The Lord wants us to live in His Love. The Lord wants that person to live in His love.

In the second reading, from Paul's First Letter to Timothy, Paul mentions an early Christian saying, "Christ came into the world to save sinners. Of these I am the foremost. But for that very reason I was mercifully treated, so that in me Christ might display all His Patience as an example for those who would come to believe in Him." Jesus came into the world to forgive sinners. And I am one of them. And, with the exception of the angels among us, so are you.

 
Readings of the day:
First Reading: Exodus 32.7-11, 13-14
Second Reading: 1 Timothy 1.12-17
Gospel: Luke 15.1-32

This material is used with permission of its author, Rev. Msgr. Joseph A. Pellegrino, Diocese of St. Petersburg, FL. Visit his website

   

Reflections are available for the following Sundays:

2019
2018
2017
2016
2015
2014
2013
2012
2011
2010
2009
2008
2007

St. Norbert's Church - Toronto